Genetics

Illustration of how the CRISPR COVID diagnostic works on a molecular level

Using two CRISPR enzymes, a COVID diagnostic in only 20 minutes

Eliminating RNA amplification simplifies and speeds up assay for SARS-CoV-2 virus, making it ideal for point of care testing.

Professor Danielle Edwards with a tortoise on Galapagos

Continuing Darwin’s work on Galapagos Island

186 years after Darwin first described the Galapagos racer snake, Danielle Edwards seeks to rebuild their population by using DNA from one of his original samples.

Red tomato hanging from a plant

Genes that keep plants green: A discovery that can help us grow crops in a drought

Scientists have discovered genetic data that will help food crops like tomatoes and rice survive longer, more intense periods of drought on our warming planet.

Young Black woman in hospital room

FDA approves first test of CRISPR to correct genetic defect causing sickle cell disease

UC scientists and physicians hope to permanently cure patients of sickle cell disease by using CRISPR-Cas9 to replace a defective gene with the normal version.

Life in the Ediacaran Sea

We’re surprisingly similar to Earth’s first animals, research says

Today’s humans share many genes with oceanic creatures missing heads.

The goal of the UC Cures for Alzheimer’s Disease Initiative is to move research for potential treatments for the disorder into early proof-of-concept clinical trials.

Could gene therapy halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease? A first-in-human clinical trial will seek answers

Earlier animal studies suggest the restorative gene treatment may slow, prevent or reverse progression of the disorder.

Blue scale on a yellow background

Is this one protein responsible for weight gain?

Diminishing a single protein in a set of mice caused them to gain only half the weight of other mice, even on a high-fat diet.

Gradient of UC colors

The 10 biggest (non-COVID!) science stories you might have missed in 2020

During any other year, these groundbreaking advances would have been big news. Here’s some of what you may have missed while you were busy washing your hands.

Doudna reacts with surprise to her win

Jennifer Doudna wins 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry

Jennifer Doudna, UC Berkeley and UCSF professor and Berkeley Lab faculty scientist, shares the prize with Emmanuelle Charpentier for their discovery of CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool for making targeted changes to the genome.

Puppy playing on a green lawn

How dogs actually age (and what that tells us about how we do)

Understanding how dogs age can help us fight human aging.

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