Kim and Jack Johnson helped to launch UC Santa Barbara's Edible Campus Program in 2015 with a tree-planting event at Storke Tower.

Taking root

Alumni Kim and Jack Johnson team with UC Santa Barbara's Edible Campus Program on a teaching farm.

Tomatoes dried in the chimney solar dryer, during an experiment led by Michael Reid and Jim Thompson at the Horticulture Innovation Lab Demonstration Center at UC Davis.

Low-income tool helps improve global nutrition, boost farmers' income

UC Davis researchers' invention measures food dryness to help prevent mold, a pervasive problem in developing countries.

 

Temecula-based Agrobiomics is commercializing a sealant developed by UC Riverside’s Philippe Rolshausen. The sealant protects grapevines from fungal damage that is shown on the right side of this vine.

Turning ideas into enterprise

UC Riverside supports innovation by bringing new technologies from the lab to the marketplace.

Apeel Sciences James Rogers

Grown in California

UC Santa Barbara is investing in the innovation pipeline that has yielded breakthrough startups like Apeel Sciences.

Learning from history

Climate-tracking tools help predict drought and mitigate its effects.

The new tractor-drawn phenotyping machine, developed at UC Davis, can measure three plants per second, using advanced sensor technology.

Breeding crops today for an uncertain tomorrow

Fast phenotyping may be the next frontier.

UC Merced professor YangQuan Chen (right) and student Brendan Smith work with drones.

New initiative advances agriculture technology education

UC Merced aims to poise today’s students at the leading edge of the nexus of food, energy and water.

UC Davis cattle

UC Davis launches $1.4M project to help Kenya's rural poor

Grant will help develop a set of interventions for poverty and drought.

UC fruit Central Valley

Despite farms, some in Central Valley struggle to find fresh food

UC Merced is spearheading a collaboration to prevent chronic disease in the community.

UC Riverside researchers, from left, Philippe Rolshausen, David Jassby, Haizhou Liu, Caroline Roper, Georgios Vidalakis, and James Borneman received a $5.1 million grant to fight a disease killing citrus trees.

Fighting a citrus killer

Research will focus on attacking disease that is destroying Florida’s citrus industry and threatens California.

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