Sunveer Bajwa, Nadia Duenas and Westley Blacklock

Students learn engineering through coffee

From green bean to your cup of joe, the process of making coffee is all engineering.

Caffeine consumption enhances memory

A cup of coffee's good not just for waking up, but also for boosting long-term memory.
woman holding wine glass

Can a glass of wine a day keep the doctor away?

Drinking in moderation — but not to excess — can help boost your immune response to vaccination.
vineyard

Grape microbes add to wine's distinctive terroir

The microbial communities living on the surface of grapes may shape a wine’s terroir — the unique blend of vineyard soil and climate of every winegrowing region.
researcher holding prototypes

'Electronic nose' will sniff out food hazards

Deal signed to develop products, testing platform for nano-sensor designed to help detect deadly pathogens in food supply chain.

Fruit flies offer clues to salt influence

Animals prefer low-salt foods over high. Fruit flies help unravel the underlying science.

California farmers face global pressures

Experts confront paradox of want in the land of plenty.
walnut

Recipe for starting a family: Add walnuts

Eating about two handfuls of the nuts a day appears to improve sperm quality.
Farmer on tractor

Student farms are seeding innovation

Long before UC Berkeley author Michael Pollan told us omnivores had a dilemma in books that questioned the industrial food complex, college students were at the forefront of a movement to rethink what we eat.

Back in the 1960s and 1970s, when organic was a foreign word to most Americans, students at UC Davis and UC Santa Cruz were part of a wave of environmental activism that sought alternatives to agricultural methods that distanced people from farms and relied on heavy use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers.

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